Our personal Blender performance TestGreen Smoothie

Updated

There is a growing demand for nutrient-dense blends. If you are a big fan of green smoothies and consider yourself needing a great source of fiber, you may want to determine how efficient your personal blender is in processing leafy vegetables. This test is a practical answer to that pondering. 

Why The Test Matters

Our leafy smoothie gets its vibrant green color from kale, spinach, and celery. It’s packed with a bitter flavor, but we don’t add fruit to sweeten it since the primary purpose of this test is to clarify the efficiency of each blender in blending fibers. And although celery is best for juicing, we still decided to incorporate it into the mixture as personal blenders often have a hard time breaking down the fibrous fibers of this ingredient. If we only use kale and spinach, the blending process may occur easier and smoother, but that will mask some important differences between the blenders.

Simply put, this test is developed with an increased difficulty level. So, if there are machines that can pass this test with ease and perfect results, we can confidently recommend them. 

Testing Recipe: 1 Serving 

  • 1 oz kale 
  • 0.5 oz spinach 
  • 1 oz celery 
  • 1 cup water

Testing Procedure 

We begin the test by cutting all the ingredients into 1-inch pieces, then placing them in the cup in the following order: spinach, kale, celery, and water. Our testing trials indicated that 20-second blending was a perfect point for performance differences that would stand out better. So, after that, we operate each blender under its highest speed for 20 seconds and its result is then strained through a mesh strainer as we want to use the pulp as a measure of the blender’s efficiency. 

However, while we find it quite easy to visually distinguish the differences between blender’s outcomes through that filtering process, it isn’t as easy for the readers. All the smoothies will look roughly the same in photos, and that results in an additional step. After removing the pulp from the liquid with a strainer, we will hold each batch under running tap water. A steady stream of water will force the tiny pulp to drain through the strainer, leaving behind the large, unblended residue solids we are after. Finally, we put all the remaining pulp into a filtered water cup. That way, you can get a clearer perspective on each blender’s result. 

Initially, we supposed it wasn’t necessary to cut these veggies into that small size, but our trials on low-capacity blenders, such as the Hamilton Beach, suggested otherwise. If you don’t cut foods small enough when blending with a narrow jar, there won’t be any room for the movement inside. Eventually, you will end up with an undrinkable combination. 

Cutting food down to the particular size prior to blending is essential, but it also makes the test become easier, though. As a result, in all of our testing trials, there wasn’t a significant difference among blenders’ outcomes; all of the contenders completed their tasks with perfect consistency and that wasn’t helpful to our evaluation. 

Scoring Scale

We put each blender through this test and give them scores on a 0-10 scale based on its blended result. This score makes up 20% of the total performance score. 

Blended Result Score 

The blended result score was marked out of 10 points based on the pulp’s fineness which is always fell into one of four variants: 

  • Very fine: 9.5-10 points 
  • Fine: 8 - 9 points
  • Coarse: 6 - 7.5 points
  • Very coarse: 5.5 points or less